Problems viewing this email? Click here  
 

CSRH Publications

November–December 2013

Centre for Social Research in Health  

Dear colleague

This is an update of articles, reports and books recently published by the Centre for Social Research in Health (CSRH) and our project partners.

To learn more about CSRH go to our website.


Released: December 2013

HIV prevention for gay men in Australia: Where do we go from here?

John de Wit and Philippe Adam

John de Wit and Philippe Adam from the UNSW Centre for Social Research in Health examine opportunities to strengthen HIV prevention for gay men in Australia in their contribution to Biomedical advances in HIV prevention: Social and behavioral perspectives. This exciting new book is edited by Lisa Eaton and Seth Kalichman from the University of Connecticut and has recently been published by Springer.

In their chapter, entitled Revolution or evolution? What can approaches based on the use of antiretroviral drugs contribute to HIV prevention in gay communities in high-income countries?, de Wit and Adam review the evidence for the possible benefits of the use of HIV treatments for prevention in Australia. Their in-depth and comprehensive analysis of potential population effects of early initiation of antiretroviral treatment and pre-exposure prophylaxis cautions against overly optimistic expectations.

In the current context of a strong increase in unprotected anal intercourse among MSM, emerging treatment-based approaches instil hope for a future without HIV and contribute to re-invigorating HIV prevention. Effectively curbing trends in HIV rates also requires producing new knowledge on factors that shape condom use and HIV/STI testing. It also requires facilitating productive partnership between behavioural prevention researchers and health educators to produce innovative campaigns for gay men. Collaborative work on a new generation of theory-driven, research-informed strategies is needed to comprehensively and efficiently address the myriad individual, social and structural barriers to consistent condoms use and regular testing among some gay men.

Click the following link to contact Professor John de Wit

 

Citation: de Wit, J. B. F., & Adam, P. C. G. (2014). Revolution or evolution? What can approaches based on the use of antiretroviral drugs contribute to HIV prevention in gay communities in high-income countries? In L. A. Eaton and S. C. Kalichman (Eds.) Biomedical advances in HIV prevention: Social and behavioral perspectives (pp. 181–204). New York: Springer.

http://www.springer.com/public+health/book/978-1-4614-8844-6 
 



Released: November 2013

Tackling homophobia in London schools: successful approaches

Peter Aggleton

In a paper recently published in the journal Sex Education, Ian Warwick from the Institute of Education, University of London, and Peter Aggleton from the Centre for Social Research in Health UNSW consider how best to address homophobia in schools. Their research points to a growing sophistication of understanding among some young people, for whom same-sex sexuality and relationships are 'ordinary' and no longer exceptional. Findings point to new ways of engaging with homophobia and homophobic bullying in urban schools. 

In European countries such as the UK, schools have a responsibility to prevent all forms of bullying, including those related to sexuality and sexual orientation. However, relatively little is known about how schools go about this work successfully.

This study aimed to identify how three secondary schools in south London, England, were addressing homophobia. Three different kinds of state schools—co-educational, boys and girls—were selected, each known to have conducted work to counter homophobic bullying. In each school, interviews were conducted with staff and pupils. Work on homophobia and homophobic bullying was said by most staff respondents to be part of a more general commitment to countering bullying and promoting dignity and respect. Pupils stated that they were keen to have homophobic bullying tackled but distinguished bullying from friendlier and more supportive practices, which they described as ‘cussing’, ‘taking the mick’ and ‘mucking about’.

Work in schools had influenced pupils to consider homophobia and its effects, although the media as well as personal and family relationships were also important in this respect. For many pupils at these London schools at least, same-sex sexuality and relationships had been normalised and were seen as ordinary and not exceptional. In the context of pupils new and often positive and sophisticated understandings of sexuality, similar schools to those participating in the study may need to adopt a rather more ‘taken-for-granted’ position with respect to sex and sexuality than has sometimes been the case in the past.

Future programs to reduce homophobia in schools should align the actions taken with pupils' own understandings about how best to address homophobia and bullying. Doing so, will not only help promote sexual health but may also contribute to broader aspects of school improvement.

Click the following link to contact Professor Peter Aggleton

 

Citation: Warwick, I., & Aggleton, P. (2013).  Bullying, ‘cussing’ and ‘mucking about’: complexities in tackling homophobia in three secondary schools in south London, UK. Sex Education. Advance online publication. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14681811.2013.854204
 



Released: November 2013

Aboriginal patterns of cancer care in NSW

Christy Newman

Qualitative research conducted at the UNSW Centre for Social Research in Health, in collaboration with Cancer Council NSW and The University of Sydney, investigated the needs and experiences of Aboriginal people with cancer, living in urban and regional New South Wales. Three papers have now been published. They reveal the importance of working with Aboriginal communities and community-controlled health organisations to increase cancer literacy and awareness of cancer and cancer care, as well as addressing broader issues affecting social inclusion within mainstream cancer care services. The present cancer care workforce, which is mainly non-Aboriginal, will require greater support in increasing their cultural awareness and confidence in ‘ways of speaking’ about cultural difference if the growing numbers of Aboriginal people affected by cancer are to be effectively engaged in care and treatment into the future.

The first paper focuses on issues relating to social inclusion for Aboriginal people with cancer; the second on issues relating to cancer literacy among Aboriginal people; and the third on the ways health professionals spoke about the issue of cultural difference in cancer care.

What next? Researchers at Cancer Council NSW who are conducting the quantitative studies in this project plan to publish a number of papers which they hope will provide important insights into the pathways to diagnosis (particularly barriers to timely diagnosis) for Aboriginal people in New South Wales, as well as their patterns of care (particularly treatment received) and survival following a cancer diagnosis.

Click the following link to contact Dr Christy Newman

 

Citations:

Treloar, C., Gray, R., Brener, L., Jackson, L. C., Saunders, V., Johnson, P., Harris, M., Butow, P., & Newman, C. E. (2013). “I can’t do this, it’s too much”: building social inclusion in cancer diagnosis and treatment experiences of Aboriginal people, their carers and health workers. International Journal of Public Health. Advance online publication. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00038-013-0466-1

Treloar, C., Gray, R., Brener, L., Jackson, L. C., Saunders, V., Johnson, P., Harris, M., Butow, P., & Newman, C. (2013). Health literacy in relation to cancer: addressing the silence about and absence of cancer discussion among Aboriginal people, communities and health services. Health and Social Care in the Community, 21(6), 655–664. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hsc.12054

Newman, C., Gray, R., Brener, L., Jackson, L. C., Johnson, P., Saunders, V., Harris, M., Butow, P., & Treloar, C. (2013). One size fits all? The discursive framing of cultural difference in health professional accounts of providing cancer care to Aboriginal people. Ethnicity and Health, 18(4), 433–447. 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13557858.2012.754408
 

 
  Copyright | Privacy policy

To update your preferences, please visit this link
To unsubscribe from all CSRH newsletter emails, please click this link